Innovations In Clinical Neuroscience

HOTTOP Multiple Sclerosis DEC 2017

A peer-reviewed, evidence-based journal for clinicians in the field of neuroscience

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12 Hot Topics in Multiple Sclerosis [December 2017] 7th Joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS Meeting October 25–28, 2017 Paris, France Highlights of selected presentations from the 2017 conference Meeting Highlights DRUG THERAPY IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS Safety of ocrelizumab in multiple sclerosis: updated analysis in patients with relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis. The OPERA I and OPERA II studies, which were in relapsing multiple sclerosis (RMS), and the ORATORIO study, which was on primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), measured the safety of ocrelizumab as a treatment for the diseases compared to interferon beta-1a. In a presentation at the 7th Joint Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis–European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS) in October 2017, 2,301 patients with MS received ocrelizumab. There were 226 adverse events (AEs), 7.18 serious AEs, 71.3 infections, and 1.86 serious infections. The researchers concluded that "the updated safety profile in the ocrelizumab MS all-exposure population is generally consistent with that seen during the controlled treatment period in the RMS and PPMS populations." Follow-ups are still in process and more data will be reported in the future. * Access the abstract online Effect of ocrelizumab on upper limb function in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis in the ORATORIO study. In the ORATORIO study, upper limb function was tested via the nine-hole peg test (9HPT) on patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). Results from the study, which compared a group of patients with PPMS who received ocrelizumab to a group receiving a placebo, were presented at the 7th Joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS meeting in Paris, France. In this study, patients took the 9HPT at baseline, Week 12, and Week 24 for each hand individually. The separate times for each hand were averaged to get an additional measurement. Ocrelizumab resulted in reduced "both hands" 9HPT times, compared to those receiving the placebo, by 37 and 39 percent at 12 and 24 weeks, respectively. Overall, ocrelizumab was determined to have a positive impact on upper limb function for patients with PPMS. * Access the abstract online Effect of ocrelizumab vs. that of interferon beta-1a on visual outcomes in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis in the OPERA studies. In a presentation at the 7th Joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS meeting in October 2017, ocrelizumab was compared to interferon beta-1a (IFNB-1a) in terms of their effect on visual outcomes for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (RMS) in the OPERA I and II trials. Low-contrast letter acuity (LCLA) measures can be used to determine if patients with MS have visual deficiencies, a common symptom of the disease. Binocular LCLA testing was done at 1.25 and 2.5 percent contrast on patients in ocrelizumab group, the IFNB-1a group, and the visually impaired group. The ocrelizumab group had a significant improvement in LCLA scores compared to the IFNB-1a group. * Access the abstract online Sustained and durable reduction in confirmed disability progression in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis receiving ocrelizumab: findings from the Phase III ORATORIO study extended control period. Results from the Phase III ORATORIO study were presented at the 7th Joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS meeting in October 2017. This particular presentation focused on testing the ability of ocrelizumab to slow disability progression in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). Patients received either ocrelizumab 600mg or a placebo every 24 weeks for at least 120 weeks until the primary endpoint of 12-week confirmed disability progression (CDP) was met a certain amount of predetermined times. The results found that ocrelizumab was able to effectively slow disease progression in patients with PPMS based on multiple markers, such as the Timed 25-foot Walk and increases in Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores from baseline. * Access the abstract online Click * to access the abstract online.

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