Innovations In Clinical Neuroscience

SEP-OCT 2014

A peer-reviewed, evidence-based journal for clinicians in the field of neuroscience

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[ V O L U M E 1 1 , N U M B E R 9 – 1 0 , S E P T E M B E R – O C T O B E R 2 0 1 4 ] Innovations in CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE 23 ABSTRACT Objective: Examine the ability of baseline electronic Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale lifetime suicidal ideation and behavior categories to predict prospective reports of suicidal behavior in psychiatric and non-psychiatric research participants. Design: Meta-analysis of 74,406 eC-SSRS assessments completed between September 2009 and December 2012. Setting: Thirty-three clinical research studies that used the electronic Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale to assess suicidal ideation and behavior at baseline and prospectively during follow-up visits. Participants: Records from 6,760 patients with psychiatric disorders (opioid dependence, generalized anxiety, major depressive, and posttraumatic stress disorders) and 2,077 nonpsychiatric disorder patients (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, epilepsy, fibromyalgia, human immunodeficiency virus, insomnia, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, pain/back pain, Parkinson's disease, restless leg syndrome) were analyzed. Measurements: Electronic Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale assessment of lifetime suicidal ideation (5 severity levels) and suicidal behavior (4 types) at baseline and prospectively reported suicidal behavior during study participation. Results: Increasingly more severe lifetime suicidal ideation at baseline was associated with a progressively greater likelihood of prospectively reported suicidal behavior during study participation. Intent to act on suicidal ideation was most predictive by JOHN H. GREIST, MD; JAMES C. MUNDT, PhD; CHAD J. GWALTNEY, PhD; JAMES W. JEFFERSON, MD; and KELLY POSNER, PhD Dr. Greist is Clinical Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin; Dr. Mundt is with the Center for Telepsychology, Madison, Wisconsin; Dr. Gwaltney is with ERT in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Dr. Jefferson is Clinical Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin; and Dr. Posner is with Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York. Innov Clin Neurosci. 2014;11(9–10):23–31 FUNDING: ERT, a clinical services provider to the biopharmaceutical industry, supported the meta-analysis of the reported data and preparation of the manuscript for publication submission. FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES: Drs. Greist, Mundt, and Jefferson are shareholders of Healthcare Technology Systems, which receives royalty payments for development and use of the electronic Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale (eC-SSRS) from ERT. Dr. Greist also received payment from ERT for manuscript preparation. Dr. Gwaltney is an employee of ERT. Dr. Jefferson is a co- developer and coauthor of the eC-SSRS and a principal at Healthcare Technology Systems, Inc. which receives royalties from eC-SSRS use. Dr. Posner receives royalties for development and use of the eC-SSRS from ERT through the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene. ADDRESS CORRESPONDENCE TO: John H. Greist, MD, Healthcare Technology Systems, Inc., 6515 Grand Teton Plaza, Suite 100, Madison, WI 53719; Phone: (608) 827- 2450; Email: jgreist@healthtechsys.com KEY WORDS: eC-SSRS; electronic patient- reported outcomes; suicide risk assessment, prospective risk [ O R I G I N A L R E S E A R C H ] Predictive Value of Baseline Electronic Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale (eC–SSRS) Assessments for Identifying Risk of Prospective Reports of Suicidal Behavior During Research Participation

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