Innovations In Clinical Neuroscience

SEP-OCT 2014

A peer-reviewed, evidence-based journal for clinicians in the field of neuroscience

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[ V O L U M E 1 1 , N U M B E R 9 – 1 0 , S E P T E M B E R – O C T O B E R 2 0 1 4 ] Innovations in CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE 187 work/school impairment score and thoughts of being better off dead (0.26). This suggests that a positive response to the "better off dead" question is associated with work, family life, social life, and total functional impairment. The failure of the C–SSRS to ask about thoughts of being better off dead leads the C– SSRS passive ideation (and therefore cumulative C–SSRS ideation scores) to underestimate the functional impairment associated with thoughts of being better off dead. There was no meaningful correlation between thoughts of being better off dead and quality of life score. This lack of correlation may be because the "better off dead" thought often occured prior to the impulsive suicidality, which made the quality of life score acutely worse. "Better off dead" and scale scores. The "better off dead" thought was highly correlated with both the total of the S-STS passive ideation score (3 items) question and the total of all five of the passive ideation items (0.86 and 0.83, respectively). The correlation of thoughts of being better off dead was considerably lower with the total of the C–SSRS passive ideation score (3 items) question (0.46). These findings suggest that the thoughts of being better off dead make a larger contribution than expected in the passive ideation item totals (the total for all 5 and the total set of 3 passive ideation items on the S-STS). There was a negative, inverse relationship between the passive FIGURE 5. Thought "I wish I were dead." FIGURE 6. Thought "I wish I could go to sleep and not wake up." FIGURE 7. Thought "I wish I was not alive anymore."

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