Innovations In Clinical Neuroscience

SEP-OCT 2014

A peer-reviewed, evidence-based journal for clinicians in the field of neuroscience

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Innovations in CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE [ V O L U M E 1 1 , N U M B E R 9 – 1 0 , S E P T E M B E R – O C T O B E R 2 0 1 4 ] 168 subject minimized her global severity score because "it was more difficult to admit to overall suicidality being more severe than it w as to admit that the hopelessness was more severe." Result 6: Time spent in suicidality and Hopelessness Spectrum. Figure 6 illustrates the relationship between the time spent in suicidality and the Hopelessness Spectrum. There is an ascending relationship between the time spent in suicidality and the Hopelessness Spectrum. A polynomial regression trendline is the best fit to the dataset: Figure 6 shows an order 2 trendline. Discussion. At the upper end of the trendline, as the subject felt more hopeless, she spent disproportionately more time in suicidality. At the highest levels of hopelessness, she often made a decision to attempt suicide. She had learned from experience that when she decided to make an attempt it was followed by a reduction in the suicidal ideation that she could not control in any way other than by deciding to make an attempt. The decision to make an attempt required that she spend much more time in planning ideation and in preparatory behaviors than she had spent experiencing the suicidal ideation that she could not otherwise control. This resulted in an increase in the time spent in suicidality. Result 7: S-STS total and SPTS total. Figure 7 illustrates the relationship between the S-STS total score and the SPTS total score. There is an ascending relationship between the S-STS total score and the SPTS total score. A polynomial regression trendline is the best fit to the dataset: Figure 7 shows an order 2 trendline. Discussion. The S-STS score does not go up in a linear relationship with the SPTS score. At the high end of S- STS scores, the subject has to engage in suicidal behaviors for the S-STS score to increase. The S-STS asks fewer details about suicidal planning than the SPTS, hence the FIGURE 5. Global severity of suicidality and Hopelessness Spectrum FIGURE 6. Time spent in suicidality and Hopelessness Spectrum FIGURE 7. Sheehan-Suicidality Tracking Scale (S-STS) total and Suicide Plan Tracking Scale (SPTS) total

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