Innovations In Clinical Neuroscience

SEP-OCT 2014

A peer-reviewed, evidence-based journal for clinicians in the field of neuroscience

Issue link: http://innovationscns.epubxp.com/i/425963

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 140 of 201

[ V O L U M E 1 1 , N U M B E R 9 – 1 0 , S E P T E M B E R – O C T O B E R 2 0 1 4 ] Innovations in CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE 141 ABSTRACT Objective: The United States Food and Drug Administration meta-analysis of registration trials of antidepressants found that emergent suicidality under the age of 25 years increases with decreasing age. This led to boxed warnings for antidepressants and the recommendation for careful assessment and monitoring of suicidality in children and adolescents. To address this need, we describe the development of a pediatric suicidality assessment and tracking scale and a novel, empirically based approach to its age-appropriate linguistic validation. Method: Starting with the adult version of the Sheehan-Suicidality Tracking Scale, we collaborated with reading specialists who use the sight word lists of Dolch and Fry and the grade level vocabulary lists of Beck, Farr, and Strickland to adapt the adult version to each age group. Results: Our approach resulted in the development and documentation of a process for linguistically validating three age-appropriate pediatric versions of the Sheehan-Suicidality Tracking Scale from the adult version of the scale: one for 6- to 8-year-olds, a second for 9- to 12-year-olds, and a third for 13- to 17-year-olds. Conclusion: Further reliability and cognitive debriefing studies are needed in diverse demographic, ethnic, and cultural groups to make the pediatric versions of the Sheehan-Suicidality Tracking Scale more reliable, more generalizable, and more useful. INTRODUCTION The finding that treatment- emergent suicidality increases with decreasing age under 25 years in the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) meta-analysis of registration trials of antidepressants 1,2 led to boxed warnings for antidepressants and the recommendation for careful assessment and monitoring of FUNDING: There was no funding for the development and writing of this article. FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES: Mrs. Amado and Mrs. Beamon are named consultants on the Pediatric versions of the Sheehan- Suicidality Tracking Scale (S-STS); and Dr. Sheehan is the author and copyright holder of the S-STS, the Sheehan-Suicidality Tracking Scale Clinically Meaningful Change Measure Version (S-STS CMCM), the Pediatric versions of the S-STS, the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), and the Suicidality Modifiers Scale, is a co-author of the Suicide Plan Tracking Scale (SPTS), and owns stock in Medical Outcomes Systems, which has computerized the S- STS ADDRESS CORRESPONDENCE TO: David V. Sheehan, MD, MBA; E-mail: dsheehan@health.usf.edu KEY WORDS: Suicide, pediatric suicide, linguistic validation in children, pediatric validation, suicidality, suicide in children, pediatric suicide scale, suicide scale, suicide risk, suicide risk in children, adolescent suicide, S-STS [ R E P O R T ] Linguistic Validation of the Pediatric Versions of the Sheehan Suicidality Tracking Scale (S-STS) by DARLENE M. AMADO, BA; DARLENE A. BEAMON, BSE, MA; and DAVID V. SHEEHAN, MD, MBA Mrs. Amado is with the University of South Florida College of Public Health and the University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida; Mrs. Beamon is with the Springfield Public School System, Springfield, Massachusetts; and Dr. Sheehan is Distinguished University Health Professor Emeritus at the University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida. Innov Clin Neurosci. 2014;11(9–10):141–163

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Innovations In Clinical Neuroscience - SEP-OCT 2014